Monday, 26 October 2015

Permitted Changes of Use – the book and the seminar


By the beginning of October, preparations were well in hand for the publication of my book - A Practical Guide to Permitted Changes of Use, but we were still awaiting an announcement of the government’s intentions with regard to the completion deadline for the residential conversion of offices under Class O, which had been due to expire on 30 May 2016.

This announcement eventually came on 12 October, and was supplemented by a further press statement from De-CLoG the following day, which included the news that demolition of existing office buildings and new build will in future be part of the permitted development under Class O.

The announcement could not have been worse-timed from the point of view of our production schedule for the book. We had to make a rapid assessment of the details that had been announced and decide how to deal with the prospective changes to Class O (and one or two other expected changes, such as the residential conversion of launderettes and light industrial buildings).

A crucial factor was clearly going to be the actual timing of these various changes. De-CLoG’s Press Office are still unsure about the precise timetable, but the best guess seems to be that these changes will all take effect at the end of next May. We have decided that there would be no point in delaying the publication of the book for six months, and so (having included in the text such details of the forthcoming changes as are presently known) we have now sent the book to the printers. This unexpected delay has meant that we will miss our intended October publication date, but the book should now come out about a week or ten days into November.

Bath Publishing have extended the pre-publication price offer on the book until 13 November, and so this is your last chance to order this book at the special pre-publication price of £35. You can order your copy now by clicking through on the link on the left-hand side of this page.

In the meantime, bookings for the seminar linked to the publication of the book have been going so well that we had sold out all the 106 places that were originally available by 16 October. Unfortunately, the larger lecture room at the Institution of Civil Engineers in Great George Street is not available, and so in view of the continuing demand for tickets, we have moved the seminar to the RIBA at 66 Portland Place, London W1B 1AD. This is equally central and equally easy to reach by public transport, and moving to the new venue will ensure that we don’t have to disappoint anyone else who would like to attend. Bookings had reached 146 by this morning, and we now have capacity for up to 250 in total. If you have already booked, Bath Publishing will be in touch with more details about the change of venue later this week.

In view of the phenomenal response that we have had, we have also extended the deadline for ‘early bird’ online bookings at the reduced price of £120 (for readers of this blog only) to 13 November, but this will be your last chance to book for the seminar at this bargain price (including a copy of the book within this price). You can book your place now by clicking through on the link on the left-hand side of this page and entering the discount code COUPRE25 when prompted, or by calling Bath Publishing on 01225 577810. Bookings made after 13 November will only be accepted at the full price of £145.

© MARTIN H GOODALL

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Excellent.

We are waiting in anticipation for the book to arrive.

One question I hope it answers relates to the potential for retrospective prior approvals for changes of use (for example where an enforcement notice has been served).

What are your thoughts on this?

Chris

Martin H Goodall LARTPI said...

Pre-ordered copies of the book should arrive this week. The answer to the anonymous query of 29 October is to be found at the end of paragraph 13.0 on page 113.

passerby said...

I suspect it highlights the logical fallacy (and therefore impossibility)of a retrospective prior approval, but let's wait and see.

Martin H Goodall LARTPI said...

Good guess, Passer-by! It does.